Let’s Change The Term “Heart Failure” To “Cardiac Impairment”

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I have cardiac sarcoidosis and as a result, I have heart failure. I really hate that term. There is such a finality to it that it makes it sound as if all hope is lost, there is no coming back.

I really wish that the medical establishment would start using a different term, such as Cardiac Impairment. Doesn’t that sound more like what it is? Heart failure sounds like your heart just stopped. Boom, you’re dead! Cardiac impairment sounds more like your heart is working, but not as well as it should.

A doctor by the name of Richard Lehman wrote an article stating exactly this in 2005, but it seems that nobody took it on, so I am rejuvenating the movement to rename Heart Failure to Cardiac Impairment.

If you have been diagnosed with heart failure, when ever any medical personnel refers to you having heart failure, tell them that you would prefer to have it referred to as cardiac impairment. I did that today at my cardiologist appointment and kept saying it every time he said heart failure. By the end of the appointment he was saying Cardiac Impairment. Enough people do that enough times, it will eventually stick.

 

Written by Basil Rene

I maintain two separate blogs. One is LifeAsAnAnomaly.com where I discuss my life with sarcoidosis and the other is AChefTalksFood.blog, where as the name implies, I talk about food.

4 comments

  1. Good Stuff. Having been undiagnosed with my Cardiac Sarcoidosis for ten years, my cardiac impairment was measured at the end of 2016 with an Ejection Fraction of 15. I had my latest Echo recently with no change! My body is compensating though, perhaps because as an adult I was an endurance athlete, competing in 2 Ironman triathlons and multiple marathons but who really knows. My specialist says that he is less concerned with the EF number but rather what i am able to do. I walk 5 miles a day consistently, benefit of having two large golden retrievers and living in a semi-rural area. I have given up weight room do to lead placement issues and finally have given up my 35 year financial practice and went on disability at age 58. I saw a doctor buddy this weekend at my local farmers market. He hasn’t seen me in a year. He commented how good he thought I looked and then said bluntly that he hadn’t expected that i would survive this long! I kinda laughed at the disparity of the comments. I am following the advice of fellow cardiac sarc friend who I met through a Sarcoidosis forum, “What you going to do!”

    Clint Bravo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good for you! It’s so easy to give up isn’t it? All you can do is continue to live and enjoy life albeit a little differently than you did before! I seriously believe that your ability to function with cardiac sarcoidosis is closely related to how active you were prior. After all, it’s an impairment, not a catastrophic failure. 😉 Keep on keeping on and thanks for saying hi! Keep in touch and let me know how it’s going for you.

      Like

      1. Basil, keep up the blog. I can so relate to your posts. If you ever make your way to New Orleans, contact me and I will buy you dinner at one of our great restaurants!

        Liked by 1 person

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